Category Archives: Inequality

Sunshine List – 111,440 Ontario Civil Service Executives Top $100,000

Ontario Sunshine List

Sunshine list shows that 111,440 public servants in the Broader Ontario Public Service earned more than $100,000 with Ontario Power Generation CEO Tom Mitchell (pictured above) topping the list with a whopping $1.55 million salary.

The number of Ontario public sector employees making six-figure salaries has now hit 111,440 according to figures released this week.

That’s 13,474 more employees than last year’s list, an increase of about 14 per cent. That means the equivalent of the population of cities the size of Thunder Bay or Kingston made this year’s list.

The top ten list of public earners was dominated by electricity, university and hospital sector big-wigs.

Topping the chart is Tom Mitchell, Ontario Power Generation (OPG) CEO, who took in a $1.55 million salary and another $6,893 in taxable benefits in 2014. This a 9.2 per cent decrease from last year, when Mitchell’s salary was $1.72 million. Continue reading

Lack of Economic Opportunity For Young People Not A Question Of Young Vs. Old – It’s A Question Of The 1% Vs. the Rest Of Us

A recent report by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), shows that Canada is the worst in the developed world in terms of income inequality.

A recent report by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), shows that Canada is the worst in the developed world in terms of income inequality.

A study released by the Conference Board of Canada last week painted a picture of a growing income gap between old and young — a gap the report says that could “trigger a backlash” among young people unwilling to pay taxes when the benefits that those taxes are paying for (CPP, medicare, etc.) largely go to their elders.

The Conference Board report raises an incredibly important issue: the lack of opportunity for young people in today’s economy.

The problem with the report is the particular spin on this tale that it shares with most mainstream media accounts of the lack of economic opportunity for young people — it pits the old against young, while studiously avoiding the real cause of the problem: government policies that have led to a widening gap between the rich and the rest of us of all ages. Continue reading